ASAE ® The Center for Association Leadership

Skip to Content

Go to Collaborate

Associations Now

Rate this item:
  • one star
  • two stars
  • three stars
  • four stars
  • five stars

Please Sign in to rate this.
Comments:
  • star
  • star
  • star
  • star
  • star

  Lauran sam , November 19, 2008

Wide Circles is highly efficient Social Media Marketing (SMM) platform, that utilizes various social network mediums and at the same time avoids issues tied to pay per click fraud.This site is very nice and helpful.
-----------------
lauran

[url=http://www.widecircles.com]Social Bookmarking[/url]
  • star
  • star
  • star
  • star
  • star

  Theresa DeConinck , October 23, 2008
Excellent article. Short and right to the point. Anyone can become a good blogger by following this advice.
  • star
  • star
  • star
  • star
  • star

  Matthew Baehr , September 09, 2008
Good practical advice anyone can follow. Check out the bibliography too.
  • star
  • star
  • star
  • star
  • star

  Scott Steen , CAE , September 09, 2008
This piece makes a lot of sense. Thanks for your straight-forward, practical advice on one of the basic challenges we face in implementing a social media strategy.
  • star
  • star
  • star
  • star
  • star

  Jamie Notter , September 08, 2008
Love the article because it does what we need more of when it comes to social media. It simply talks about how you do it, rather than focusing specifically on the technology issues. Well done.
  • star
  • star
  • star
  • star
  • star

  Chris Condayan , September 08, 2008
Good article Maddie and Lindy. Lot's of great tips for getting conversations started.

However, as previously pointed out by Frank Fortin, be weary of excluding the CAPTCHA feature - even with CAPTCHA on you will get some spam - see http://blogs.zdnet.com/security/?p=1835 for an article on India's emerging CAPTCHA solving industry.

By the way, I have to say, ASAE's Associations Now should follow some of the advice in this piece and apply it their site. The irony of having to log in to rate and comment on an article about blogging, Facebook, Web 2.0 marketing, etc., is pretty thick.

Follow me on Twitter @csuspect
  • star
  • star
  • star
  • star
  • star

  Sharon Kneebone , CAE , September 08, 2008
Lindy and Maddie are dead on with this article. I especially like how they address objectives in the first paragraph. Blogging, like all social media, should be used strategically. The authors give great practical advice as well. Sometimes as association professionals we worry so much about controlling the message that we loose sight of the true power of social media: it is interactive, instantaneous, and powerful.
  • star
  • star
  • star
  • star
  • star

  Frank Fortin , CAE , September 07, 2008
I love everything about this but your absolute position on no barriers. I can accept no moderation, but there is so much spamming going on, the "no captcha" rule goes a little too far for me. We do have liability issues to consider. Captchas may be annoying, but spam is worse. If we didn't have them, our blog site would have been overridden by spam - unbelievable, really.
  • star
  • star
  • star
  • star
  • star

  Bill Sheridan , CAE , September 07, 2008
Great suggestions! So many of our members seem reluctant to join the conversation. Maybe we can lure them in by following some of the advice in this article.
  • star
  • star
  • star
  • star
  • star

  Sterling Raphael , September 07, 2008
Amazing and comprehensive guide to blogging with a purpose. As stated here... having a voice, being open, challenging, listening, etc... can help most organizations empower themselves (and their audience) for meaningful change.

Also, blogging efforts around events can ignite dialogue. Posting blogs to your attendees before, during, and after events with structure yet open dialogue can really makes the "during" of your event much more effective.
  • star
  • star
  • star
  • star
  • star

  Robert Wolfe , September 07, 2008
Great thoughts, especially opening up the blog completely (I didn't realize those annoying letter patterns had an official name.) Also I love that you mentioned that tech should be transparent - reducing the tech lingo with phrases that actually mean something to users is awesome insight.
  • star
  • star
  • star
  • star
  • star

  David Sabol , September 07, 2008
This is spot-on advice and a great reference not only for associations/individuals that are just getting started with blogging but also for those who have been doing it for a while. I think that the fundamental theme and one that is worth repeating is that blogging, and any other social media for that matter, is not a one way street. It's a bi-directional highway useful for sending AND receiving information. However, if you take the ability to interact out of the mix you are left with yet another static communication medium and there are already more than enough of those.

As Maddie and Lindy point out, blogging is not a "create it and forget it" communication medium. It takes time, persistence, patience, focus and creativity. In the end you will only get out of it what you put into it. You not only have to get your audience interested in what you saying but you also have to provide them with a way to participate in the discussion. And as for engaging, recognizing and communicating with your readers, YOU HAVE TO DO IT. It's called positive reinforcement and if your goal is to build a loyal and responsive readership or community, you not only have to make it easy for them to share their thoughts (even if you don't agree with them or they are controversial) but you also have to recognize them for taking time to do so. I do find it somewhat interesting that some associations have a problem with this when in other mediums they do such an outstanding job of recognizing and rewarding their membership.

This is rock solid advice from two individuals who practice what they preach. Ignore it at your own peril. As for me, I will be bookmarking it and reading it repeatedly because the ideas they share are what sets apart the successful blogger from the unsuccessful.
  • star
  • star
  • star
  • star
  • star

  Peggy Hoffman , CAE , September 05, 2008
I know its scary but we really do have to have faith and stop putting barriers up - glad to see that spelled that. This is going to be bookmarked for sure (not to mentioned shared on FaceBook. What's next from you two?
  • star
  • star
  • star
  • star
  • star

  David Patt , CAE , September 05, 2008
Great tips! (Especially about moderating comments). I'm saving this list. You should also advise people not to be afraid to post comments. Some folks think they'll be seen as chronic commenters, but their dialog is important to keep the discussion alive.
  • star
  • star
  • star
  • star
  • star

  KiKi L'Italien , September 03, 2008
The Wonder Twins of the Association world have done it again! Thanks for the great tips! I really like what you posted about including commenters on the conversation. I think that is where many blogs go wrong. People want to be involved!
  • star
  • star
  • star
  • star
  • star

  Maggie McGary , September 03, 2008
Amen to not moderating comments. There is nothing more annoying than taking the time to comment on a post only to have it not show up immediately. At best it makes you wonder if there was a glitch and your comment didn't get sent; at worst you know it got sent and the blogger purposely didn’t post it. As far as I’m concerned, as long as a comment isn’t obscene or otherwise offensive, it should be posted. A blogger who picks and chooses which comments to publish automatically negates that blog’s authenticity.
  • star
  • star
  • star
  • star
  • star

  Renato Sogueco , September 03, 2008
Great, practical tips on injecting "life" into our blogs. I've printed/emailed this article for our communications staff and will use in my own blog. Thank you Lindy and Maddie!
  • star
  • star
  • star
  • star
  • star

  Scott Sherrin , September 03, 2008
This is a great, to-the-point synopsis of some of those things associations likely are overlooking when it comes to their blogs (I know my association is!). It all makes perfect sense, of course, but we always tend to forget the basics when we're trying something we're not as familiar with. Thanks for putting all these great points in one article.