ASAE ® The Center for Association Leadership

Skip to Content

Go to Collaborate

Associations Now

Rate this item:
  • one star
  • two stars
  • three stars
  • four stars
  • five stars

Please Sign in to rate this.
Comments:
  • star
  • star
  • star
  • star
  • star

  Jeffrey Cufaude , September 19, 2012
Livelier and shorter indeed seems to be taking many conferences by storm, but we need to remain vigilant in assessing whether or not whatever formats used actually facilitate learning and lead to behavioral change and individual and organizational improvements. The fact that such relatively simple shifts in format are being seen as a revolution is somewhat of an indictment about how boring and ineffective our programming must have been in the hands of some of its presenters. As Glenn notes, effective sessions have long incorporated these concepts into their design and delivery.
  • star
  • star
  • star
  • star
  • star

  Patricia Scott Timus , August 21, 2012
I'm very excited about a new approach to conference educational sessions that involve the attendees and uses their collection experience and knowledge to learn from each other. What are the ineffective practices with flashy names I should steer away from in planning my next meeting? I'm somewhat new to this.
  • star
  • star
  • star
  • star
  • star

  Glenn Tecker , August 01, 2012
Kim Fernandez has done a great job in describing (1) effective practices that have been in use for years without the flashy names and (2) ineffective practices that have in use for just as many years and were often disguised with flashy names. The actual change is in the proportion of more good to less bad. Driving the change is a shift in viewing education as what will be taught to what will be learned.
The emergence of e-books with connections to video, instant access to related documents and simulation, and virtual reality as safe environment for practice is bringing all new dimensions to self-f instruction. Associations can provide such opportunities. But they also have the advantage of being able to provide connection between learners.
The critical design decision has to do with the best match between what (a) the learner wants/needs to know, understand, value or be able to do and (b) the instructional strategy that matches content and learning styles. The integration of technology –either hard or soft - just because you can - that doesn’t
The vast majority of both live and virtual audiences still prefer: [a] meaningful content over vapid content in flashy wrappers with inflated labels, [b] connection with others with instant exchange over time delayed response and [c] exploration with others whose company the enjoy over isolation.

  • star
  • star
  • star
  • star
  • star

  Maddie Grant , CAE , August 01, 2012
YES. These changes are being reflected in online learning too! We're getting a ton if interest in social learning, in how to integrate social media into educational programming, and hybrid meetings which have content specifically for a virtual audience.